LEGEND, BY MARIE LU

October 1, 2018

Review by Tony Li

I read a book called Legend by Marie Lu over the summer, and I thought that’s the best book i’ve ever read. I really like the book because it’s funny and very interesting. It contains some fighting. Marie Lu’s dystopian novel is a Legend in the making.

In this novel, our world has changed (both politically and climatically). What is the division of the United States into a war country. Day belongs to the lower class, but it makes life unable to attack the dominant party in which he lives. Los Angeles agencies are shocked by the rise in water levels and the impact of the storm. His goal in life is to get the Republic into trouble, robbing banks, blowing up jet fighters and causing chaos. But he also follows his family and provides food as much as possible. When his brother became a victim of the plague, he knew he had to steal the vaccine to save him.

June is the opposite of Day: she is from the upper class, she is the only one who gets a perfect score in the experiment, a series of tests determine the child’s life path: education, wages, living conditions. Like her brother, she is training and becoming a member of the army. But then the disaster struck her: her brother was killed in the attack on the hospital. The military immediately saw Day as the murderer and allowed June to focus all of his attention on the capture day and participate in the execution.

The novel itself moves back and forth between the chapters of each viewpoint. This is a powerful structural format that allows readers to understand their changing understanding of the world and the factions it supports. Lu’s writing is very good. The only really frustrating thing is that from the early days of the book, the main plot distortions are obvious. But beyond that, the novel seems to apply to this type too: good and bad; some good sequences of action.

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